How to Apply for Canadian Permanent Residence From Ukraine

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How to Apply for Canadian Permanent Residence From Ukraine
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Despite COVID-19 global pandemic restricted travel, Ukraine rose in the rankings of the most important sources of new Canadian permanent residents in the first 11 months of 2020. 

In 2019, Ukraine was in the 23rd spot on that list, providing 2,995 new permanent residents to Canada.

But during the first 11 months of 2020, Ukraine’s relative importance as a source of new permanent residents nudged upwards as immigration from Somalia, which had been ahead of it in the rankings the previous year, was particularly hard hit last year by the pandemic.

With the month of December figures still not in, the number of Somalis who became new permanent residents in Canada dropped by 72.3 per cent last year, falling to 905 from the 3,275 who had made the move the previous year.

With that, Ukraine rose to become the 22nd most important source of new permanent residents to Canada in 2020 even as the number of Ukrainians becoming new permanent residents fell compared to the previous year due to the pandemic.

Ukrainian immigrants are expected to have an easier time coming to Canada once the COVID-19 travel restrictions are lifted due to an agreement announced in January 2021.

The newly-created Canada-Ukraine Mobility Working Group was unveiled to identify and improve opportunities for Ukrainians hoping to come to Canada. 

“Through generations of Ukrainians who have made Canada their home, the Ukrainian-Canadian community continues to make outstanding contributions to Canada’s economy, our society and our diverse cultural fabric,” said Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Minister Marco Mendicino.

Ukrainian New Permanent Residents Drop Due to Pandemic

The number of Ukrainians who became permanent residents in Canada in the first 11 months of last year was off by almost 47.6 per cent, to 1,570 with the December statistics still to come.

The Eastern European nation is still below both Iraq, which provided Canada with 4,445 new permanent residents in 2019, and Egypt which provided 3,655 that same year.

Although the number of newcomers from Iraq and Egypt also dropped during the first 11 months of 2020, immigration from these two countries still remained somewhat stronger than that from Ukraine.

The number of new permanent residents from Iraq dropped by almost 62.9 per cent, to 1,650, and the number of Egyptians making that move fell by about 51.4 per cent to 1,755 for the first 11 months of last year compared to 2019.

Gripped firmly in the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, Canada is only now seeing the number of new daily cases of COVID-19 start to subside. Ottawa has launched an ambitious national vaccination schedule and hopes to have the majority of Canadians inoculated by the end of September. 

When that happens, immigration is likely to become more important than ever. 

Even during the pandemic, Canada continued to bring in permanent residents who had qualified before the international travel restrictions were put in place and welcomed temporary foreign workers that were vital to securing the country’s food supply.

Although the pandemic did cause a major slowdown in Canada’s immigration processes, the opportunities to immigrate remain and the country is still committed to its immigration levels plan that was released shortly before COVID-19 made itself felt in Canada. 

In that plan, Ottawa announced its intention to welcome more than 1.2 million new permanent residents through to the end of 2022.


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The message from Canada’s federal government is clear: Canada wants and will continue to welcome immigrants to Canada.

Ukraine is no exception. 

Prior to the spread of COVID-19 throughout the world in late 2019, Ukrainians were a steady and important source of new permanent residents to Canada, with annual figures hovering at about the 3,300 marks.

In 2020, though, the typical spring and summer bump in the number of Ukrainians becoming new permanent residents in Canada simply never materialized as the border and travel restrictions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 played havoc with immigration.

In the first quarter of last year, 600 Ukrainians become new permanent residents of Canada. The second quarter, only 320 did. There was a slight bump up in the third quarter of the year, between the first and second waves of the pandemic in Canada, but the numbers fell off again as new daily case numbers climbed at the end of the year. In the fourth quarter of 2020, only 235 Ukrainians became new permanent residents of Canada in the two months for which figures are available.

There was a drop of almost 31.7 per cent from the first quarter of the year to the third quarter, the last full quarter for which figures are complete.


Ukrainian Immigration to Canada, 2020


Ukrainian Immigrants to Canada by Year


With one month of figures still to come in, Ukrainians seem to have accounted for just under one per cent of all new permanent resident arrivals to Canada in 2020.

Although that may seem like a small share of new permanent residents to Canada in 2020, it is actually more than the total of all the Irish, Spanish and Swiss who made Canada their permanent residence that year. 

The biggest source of new permanent residents during the first 11 months of 2020 was India with 41,085 people from that country choosing to make Canada their home, more than 23.6 per cent of the total 173,865 new permanent residents to Canada during that period. 

China was then the next-biggest source of new permanent residents to Canada, with 15,860 Chinese citizens immigrating to Canada.


New 2020 Canada Permanent Residents by Country of Citizenship


If you are looking to apply for Canada permanent residence from Ukraine, the first step is to assess which programs give you the best chance of success.

What Are The Options For Immigrating To Canada From Ukraine?

Broadly, the options are:

  • Federal Economic Class.
  • Provincial Economic Class.
  • Quebec Immigration.
  • Business Immigration, including the Start-Up Visa Program.
  • Temporary Residence First, Then Transition To Permanent.
  • Family Class Sponsorship.

1) Federal Economic Class

Canada accepts the largest number of immigrants under the economic class, with annual levels set to move over 200,000 in the category over the next three years.

The largest group within the economic class is the Federal High Skilled category.

There are many immigration streams to be considered when considering applying for Canadian permanent residence from Ukraine.

What Are Canada’s Federal Economic Class Programs?

Canada operates its federal economic class immigration system using Express Entry. Many provinces also follow a similar approach.

Express Entry requires candidates to submit a profile, with the highest scoring profiles issued an Invitation to Apply to one of the above immigration programs.

Candidates then get 60 days to submit a full application.

Under Express Entry, candidates score Comprehensive Ranking System points for core factors such as age, education, work experience and language ability.


What Is The Express Entry Process?

  • Submit profile and enter Express Entry Pool.
  • Get issued an Invitation to Apply if you meet minimum points requirement.
  • Submit an application in 60 days.
  • Get a decision in target processing time of six months.
  • If successful, move to Canada.

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Several of Canada’s provinces also operate Express Entry streams, allowing them to tap skilled workers from the pool.

A provincial nomination is worth 600 points and effectively guarantees an Invitation to Apply.

If you meet the requirements, Express Entry can be a fast way to achieve Canada immigration, with target processing times of six months once the full application is received.

What Are Canada’s Provincial Programs?

If you do not qualify through a federal economic program, the next step is to consider provincial streams for your application for permanent residence from Ukraine.

Each one of Canada’s provinces runs its own immigration programs, targeting the specific demands of local labour markets.

If you have specific skills, there could be a provincial stream waiting to accept you.

Quebec has autonomy over its immigration system, with the right to set its own immigration levels and the power to operate its own programs.

Quebec recently launched an Expression of Interest system similar to Express Entry, where candidates submit profiles to the Arrima system and are issued periodic invitations to apply.

Can I Apply For A Business Immigration Program?

Canada also aims to attract entrepreneurs and investors through its business immigration programs, with many applications accepted from Ukraine.

At the federal level, options include:

Start-Up Visa Program

Canada’s Start-Up Visa Program offers Canadian permanent residence to qualified immigrant entrepreneurs.

The program targets innovative entrepreneurs and links them with private sector investors in Canada who will help establish their start-up business.

Candidates can initially come to Canada on a work permit supported by their designated Canada-based investor, before qualifying for permanent residence once their business is up and running.

There are three types of private-sector investor:

  1. Angel investor.
  2. Venture capital fund.
  3. Business incubator.

Initially a three-year pilot, the program was made permanent on March 31, 2018.


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What Are the Start-Up Visa Candidate Eligibility Requirements?

The basic candidate eligibility requirements for the Start-Up Visa are:

  1. Qualifying business.
  2. Commitment Certificate and Letter of Support from a designated entity.
  3. Sufficient unencumbered, available and transferable settlement funds.
  4. Proficiency in English or French at minimum Canadian Language Benchmark level 5.

What Is A Start-Up Visa Program Designated Entity?

A designated entity is a Canadian private sector angel investor, venture capital fund or business incubator.

The required commitment must meet the following criteria:

  1. A designated angel investor group must invest at least $75,000 into the qualifying business. Candidates can also qualify with two or more investments from angel investor groups totalling $75,000.
  2. A designated venture capital fund must confirm that it is investing at least $200,000 into the qualifying business. Candidates can also qualify with two or more commitments from designated venture capital funds totalling $200,000.
  3. A designated business incubator must accept the applicant into its business incubator program.

What Are the Start-Up Visa Program Business Ownership Requirements?

For the candidate to qualify for permanent residence:

  1. The intended business must be incorporated and carrying on business in Canada.
  2. The candidate must own at least 10 percent of the voting rights in the corporation.
  3. No other person can hold 50 percent or more of the voting rights in the corporation.

NOTE: Up to five candidates may have their permanent residence application supported by the same business investment. However, certain candidates may be designated essential to the business. If any essential candidate withdraws their application, or are refused, all other candidates under the same business investment will see their applications terminated.

Quebec Immigrant Investor Program

One of Canada’s most popular business programs is the Quebec Immigrant Investor Program.

It is the only passive investment program that leads to Canadian permanent residence.

Intake for the Quebec Investor is currently paused as the provincial government reviews the requirements.


Quebec Investor: Primary Requirements

  • Legally acquired personal net worth of $2 million;
  • Two years of suitable management or business experience within the five years preceding the application;
  • Investment of $1.2 million into a passive government guaranteed investment for a period of five years bearing no interest;
  • Intend to settle in the province of Quebec.

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Quebec also runs Immigrant Entrepreneur and Self-Employed programs.

Several of Canada’s other provinces also operate business programs as a route to permanent residence from the Ukraine.

Increasingly, the provinces require time spent in Canada setting up a business as a temporary resident before candidates are nominated for permanent residence.

Owner-Operator Business Immigration

Candidates looking to immigrate to Canada from the Ukraine should also consider the Buy a Business and Move to Canada Program.

Federal owner-operator rules allow a candidate to buy a business and move to Canada on a temporary work permit, before transitioning to permanent residence further down the line.

Under this policy a work permit is issued following the sale and transfer of the majority share ownership of an existing profitable Canadian business to the immigration candidate.

Can I Transition From Temporary To Permanent Residence?

Increasingly, immigrants are coming to Canada as temporary residents and transitioning to permanent residents.

Canada continues to accept temporary workers in priority occupations during the coronavirus pandemic.

This is a popular route for candidates who do not immediately qualify for permanent residence when applying from the Ukraine.

Time spent in Canada as a temporary resident counts towards a permanent residence application.

Work permits are issued through the Temporary Foreign Worker ProgramInternational Mobility Program and International Experience Canada Program.

Caregivers also have their own streams for work permits (under the TFWP) and transition to permanent residence.

What Is Family Class Immigration?

Candidates in the Ukraine with family members who are already permanent residents or citizens can apply through Family Class Sponsorship immigration.

Which Family Members Can Be Sponsored For Canada Immigration From The Ukraine?

  • Spouse
  • Common Law partner
  • Conjugal partner
  • Dependent children
  • Parents
  • Grandparents
  • Brothers or sisters, nephews or nieces, granddaughters or grandsons who are orphaned, under 18 years of age and not married or in a common-law relationship
  • Another relative of any age or relationship but only under specific conditions
  • Accompanying relatives of the above (for example, spouse, partner and dependent children).

What Are The Requirements To Be A Sponsor?

  • You must be 18 years of age or older.
  • You and the sponsored relative must sign a sponsorship agreement that commits you to provide financial support for your relative, if necessary. This agreement also says the person becoming a permanent resident will make every effort to support her or himself.
  • You must provide financial support for a spouse, common-law or conjugal partner for three years from the date they become a permanent resident.
  • You must provide financial support for a dependent child for 10 years, or until the child turns 25, whichever comes first.
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Colin Singer is an international acclaimed Canadian immigration lawyer featured on Wikipedia. Colin Singer is founding director of the Canadian Citizenship & Immigration Resource Center (CCIRC) Inc. He served as an Associate Editor of ‘Immigration Law Reporter’, the pre-eminent immigration law publication in Canada. He previously served as an executive member of the Canadian Bar Association’s Quebec and National Immigration Law Sections and is currently a member of the Canadian Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. Colin has twice appeared as an expert witness before Canada’s House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration. He is frequently recognized as a recommended authority at national conferences sponsored by government and non-government organizations on matters affecting Canada’s immigration and human resource industries. Since 2009, Colin has been a Governor of the Quebec Bar Foundation a non-profit organization committed to the advancement of the profession, and became a lifetime member in 2018.